Marvelous Pictures of the Wrigley Building, Chicago, Illinois for Sale

Wrigley Building
Wrigley Building

Friedman Fine Art presents a collection of contemporary and historical photographs of Chicago. The Wrigley Building is known for its clock tower on the south building. It features four large dials with a diameter of about 20 feet. The long aluminum hour and minute hands reach 6 ft and 9 ft. The building also has white terra-cotta cladding and floodlighting. The building was the first landmark in Chicago to be floodlighted. It was also Chicago’s first air-conditioned office building.

Located at across Michigan Avenue from the Tribune Tower on the Magnificent Mile near north side of Chicago, the Wrigley Building was built in 1920 by the company founder William Wrigley Jr. as the corporate headquarters of the Wrigley Company. Two years earlier, the widening of Michigan Avenue opened up a wide boulevard across the Chicago River. Seeing the opportunity, William Wrigley, Jr., purchased land near the Michigan Avenue Bridge to build the city’s first landmark skyscraper north of the Chicago River.

The building was designed by architectural firm Graham, Anderson, Probst & White, based on the Giralda tower of the cathedral in Seville. The first section, a 425-foot south tower, was completed in April 1921, and its second section, the north tower, was finished in May 1924. Walkways connect the two towers.

The Wrigley Building was sold in 2011 to the Zeller Realty Group and Groupon co-founders Eric Lefkofsky and Brad Keywell. They plan on adding a Walgreens, a fitness center, and a nursing room for mothers, making the building more attractive to businesses. View more stunning historic Chicago photographs.

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