Buckingham Fountain Chicago Photographs

chicago-buckingham-fountain-photos

Marvelous Photograph of Chicago’s Buckingham Fountain lit up at dusk

Friedman Fine Art offers a marvelous selection of historical and contemporary photographs taken by Chicago photographers. In the center of Grant Park, Chicago, Buckingham Fountain is one of the largest fountains in the world. It runs until 11 pm, from April to October, producing a major water display with a center jet that shoots 150 feet into the air. At dusk, the Fountain’s water display is accompanied by a light and music show. During the winter, the fountain is decorated with festival lights.

The fountain’s official name is the Clarence Buckingham Memorial Fountain. On August 26, 1927, Kate Sturges Buckingham dedicated the structure to the people of Chicago in memory of her brother, Clarence. She donated one million dollars to the Fountain and established the Buckingham Fountain Endowment Fund to pay for its maintenance. The Fountain officially opened to the public on May 26, 1927.

The Buckingham Fountain consists of four basins composed of carved granite and pink Georgia marble. The bottom pool of the fountain is about 280 feet in diameter, with a 103-foot lower basin, a 60-foot middle basin, and a 24-foot upper basin.

Beaux arts architect Edward H. Bennett designed the Fountain with French sculptor Marcel Loyau and engineer Jacques H. Lambert. Its design was inspired by the Bassin de Latome and modeled after Latona Fountain at Versailles. The Buckingham Fountain however, is twice the size and recirculates approximately three times more water than Latona Fountain.

The Fountain is considered Chicago’s front door, located at Columbus Drive and Congress Parkway. It symbolizes Lake Michigan and four sea horses on the structure represent the states of Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Indiana, that border the lake.

In 1994, the fountain received about $2 million to restore its three smallest basins, which developed leaks due to Chicago’s winters. Recent renovation on the under drainage system, landscaping, lighting and bronze elements of Buckingham Fountain that began in September 2008 has not been completed due to lack of funds.

For more information about images of Buckingham Fountain, please, contact us at 312-666-9797.

 

Buy Historic Black and White Chicago Building Photographs

Fisher Building
Fisher Building

Friedman Fine Art offers a diverse collection of historical and contemporary photographs in Chicago. At 275 feet, the Fisher Building is a 20-story neo-Gothic landmark, located in the Chicago Loop at 343 South Dearborn Street. The building is known for its interesting terra cotta tracery, or carvings of aquatic creatures including fish and crabs on the lower floors. There are carvings of eagles, dragons, and mythical creatures on the upper floors.

Designed by Charles Atwood of D.H. Burnham and Company, the first phase of the Fisher Building opened in 1896. This 18-story building measured about 230 feet tall and was the second-tallest building in the city at the time. Its steel frame took only 25 days to complete. An addition on the north side of the building was made in 1906, which raised the building from 18 to 20 stories. Former employee of the Burnham firm Peter J. Weber, designed and oversaw the addition, which was completed in 1907.

The interior of the building was decorated with expensive materials. Many of the floors had colorful mosaic designs. The wainscoting was composed of Carrara marble and mahogany wood was present in its the trim.

Today, the Fisher Building is the oldest 18-story building in Chicago that has not been demolished. It is currently owned and managed by Village Green Management Company, and has apartments on floors 3–20 and commercial stores on the first and second floors. To purchase this vintage photograph or more Chicago photographs.

Buy The Daley Center Exterior Photograph

Chicago Photo
Daley Center

Friedman Fine Art offers a variety of historical and contemporary photographs
taken by the finest Chicago photographers.

The Richard J. Daley Center occupies the city block bound by Randolph, Clark, Washington and Dearborn Streets. Also known as Daley Plaza, the Center is named after Mayor Richard J. Daley since 1976, changed from its original name, the Chicago Civic Center.

Completed in 1965, the main building was designed by Jacques Brownson of the firm C. F. Murphy Associates. The Daley Center has 30 floors, having more than 120 and hearing rooms. It offers office space for both the city and Cook County. The building also contains the Cook County Law Library, offices of the Clerk of the Circuit Court, and divisions of the Sheriff’s Department.

The Daley Center is operational from 8:00 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. and is accessible by rail and bus routes. A pedway is open until 6 pm to allow people underground access between the City Hall/County Building and the CTA.

In the Daley Plaza next to the building is a Cor-ten steel sculpture. Designed by artist Pablo Picasso, it reaches 50 feet and retains a red, brown color. The Cor-Ten was designed to rust to strengthen the sculpture. The sculpture was completed in 1967, as a gift to the city from the artist. This sculpture became a Chicago landmark.

Also in the plaza is an eternal flame memorial to the dead from World War I, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. The Daley Center Plaza can be used for civic events or cultural events in the city. To learn more about historical Chicago photographs.

Marvelous Chicago Photographs Available for Purchase

Chicago Photo Grant Park
The General John A. Logan Statue, Grant Park, Chicago Illinois

Friedman Fine Art features a marvelous selection of black and white photographs of Chicago.

In Chicago’s Grant Park, the State of Illinois erected one of the great war memorials, the General John A. Logan Statue. Born near Murphysboro, Jackson County, in Illinois, John A. Logan (1826 – 1886) was a soldier in the Mexican-American War and a general in the Union Army in the Civil War. As Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic from 1868 to 1871, he also helped recognize Memorial Day.

Logan is also known for his political career in Illinois, becoming an Illinois state senator. He also served terms as a congressman.

Logan was the author of two books on the Civil War, The Great Conspiracy: Its Origin and History (1886) and The Volunteer Soldier of America (1887). Logan is one of only three people mentioned by name in the Illinois state song. He is the father of U.S. Army officer and Medal of Honor recipient John Alexander Logan, Jr. for actions during the Philippine–American War.

Logan now rests at United States Soldiers’ and Airmen’s Home National Cemetery but his statue remains in Grant Park as a reminder of war. The statue shows Logan on horseback rallying his troops during the Civil War. It was sculpted by Augustus Saint-Guadens and Alexander Phimister and completed in 1897.

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