Buy The Daley Center Exterior Photograph

Chicago Photo
Daley Center

Friedman Fine Art offers a variety of historical and contemporary photographs
taken by the finest Chicago photographers.

The Richard J. Daley Center occupies the city block bound by Randolph, Clark, Washington and Dearborn Streets. Also known as Daley Plaza, the Center is named after Mayor Richard J. Daley since 1976, changed from its original name, the Chicago Civic Center.

Completed in 1965, the main building was designed by Jacques Brownson of the firm C. F. Murphy Associates. The Daley Center has 30 floors, having more than 120 and hearing rooms. It offers office space for both the city and Cook County. The building also contains the Cook County Law Library, offices of the Clerk of the Circuit Court, and divisions of the Sheriff’s Department.

The Daley Center is operational from 8:00 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. and is accessible by rail and bus routes. A pedway is open until 6 pm to allow people underground access between the City Hall/County Building and the CTA.

In the Daley Plaza next to the building is a Cor-ten steel sculpture. Designed by artist Pablo Picasso, it reaches 50 feet and retains a red, brown color. The Cor-Ten was designed to rust to strengthen the sculpture. The sculpture was completed in 1967, as a gift to the city from the artist. This sculpture became a Chicago landmark.

Also in the plaza is an eternal flame memorial to the dead from World War I, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. The Daley Center Plaza can be used for civic events or cultural events in the city. To learn more about historical Chicago photographs.

Buy Photos of Chicago’s Riverwalk

Chicago Pictures
Chicago Riverwalk

Friedman Fine Art presents contemporary and historical photographs of Chicago, including a diverse selection of black and white photographs. Called the “Second Lakefront,” the Chicago Riverwalk has been known as a great place to explore Chicago’s history, culture, and architecture. Extending from Lake Shore Drive to Franklin Street, the Riverwalk sits on the south bank of theChicago River in downtown Chicago.

The Riverwalk provides a quantity of public walkways and seating areas along the shore, where visitors can view skyscrapers and watch passing boats. The Riverwalk also has attractions such as cafes, boat cruises, tours, and water taxis.

The Riverwalk is the largest at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Plaza at State and Wabash streets, which was built in 2005 to commemorate the war. Here the Riverwalk consists of a lush lawn, a waterfall, and a center pool.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel plans to extend the Riverwalk for another six blocks along Chicago’s River, from State to Lake streets. Learn how to purchase more photos for your home of office by following this link, Chicago Photography and Chicago Photographs for sale.

Photograph of the Aqua Building located in Chicago, Illinois

Aqua
Aqua Building

www.chicago-photographs.com is a site for Friedman Fine Art, featuring contemporary and historical photographs of Chicago. Located at 225 North Columbus Drive, Aqua is an 82-story skyscraper in the Lakeshore East development in downtown Chicago. The building contains 55,000 sq ft of retail and office space, 215 hotel rooms, 476 rental residential units, and 263 condominiums. Aqua was the first downtown building to combine condos and apartments with a hotel.

At a height of 870 feet, the skyscraper is topped by a 82,550 sq ft terrace with gardens, gazebos, pools, a running track, and a fire pit. It was named #22 on Chicago Magazine’s list of the Top 40 Buildings in Chicago. The Aqua was named the skyscraper of the year, receiving the Emporis Skyscraper Award in 2009.

Designed by Jeanne Gang of Studio Gang Architects, the building was the largest project ever given to an American firm headed by a woman. Construction of the building began in 2006 and the building was finished by 2010.

Concrete balconies resembling waves protrude from its surface. Each floor plate in Aqua is unique, resulting in artistically unequal balconies. Magellan Development Group LLC named the building “Aqua” for these wave-like balconies. Its proximity to Lake Michigan also influenced the name.

Gang gave the building sustainable features like rainwater collection systems and energy efficient lighting. She and her team made the terrace extensions maximize solar shading. The green roof on top of the tower is the largest in Chicago. Follow the link to purchase marvelous photos of Chicago.

Classic Photo of Calder’s Flamingo in Downtown Chicago Illinois

Calder's Flamingo
Calder’s Flamingo

Friedman Fine Art presents historical and contemporary photographs of Chicago. The Calder’s Flamingo, located in the Federal Plaza in front of the Kluczynski Federal Building in Chicago, has a curved shape and vivid color that contrasts drastically with the glass and angular steel in the buildings surrounding it. The Flamingo weighs 50 tons and stands 53 feet tall, composed of steel stabile, a material pioneered by its designer American artist Alexander Calder. Calder gave the stabile its unique color, which has been called “Calder red.” Despite its appearance, the structure is stationary, as opposed to a mobile structure.

Flamingo was the first work of art commissioned by the General Services Administration under the federal Percent for Art program, which sets a percentage of its budget to public art. The plaza, surrounded by rectangular modern buildings, needed an arching art form with dynamic surfaces. Calder was commissioned to design the structure and he revealed the model for Flamingo on April 23, 1973 at the Art Institute of Chicago. The sculpture was presented to the public on October 25, 1974.

For the past 38 years, the Flamingo has occupied a civic space known for serious debates.

Chicago’s Federal Plaza is known as the site of mass demonstrations against anything from the war in Afghanistan to Obamacare, the Flamingo presiding over all the protests.

Despite its large size, the open design allows people to walk under and through the sculpture, leading one to perceive it to human scale. The structure is open to the public daily.

Currently, the General Services Administration is implementing a four-week restoration of the sculpture. The treatment includes coating the metal with a zinc-rich primer for extra durability, and applying a topcoat of “Calder Red” paint to prevent corrosion. To purchase visit our Chicago Photographs contact form.