Buckingham Fountain Chicago Photographs

chicago-buckingham-fountain-photos

Marvelous Photograph of Chicago’s Buckingham Fountain lit up at dusk

Friedman Fine Art offers a marvelous selection of historical and contemporary photographs taken by Chicago photographers. In the center of Grant Park, Chicago, Buckingham Fountain is one of the largest fountains in the world. It runs until 11 pm, from April to October, producing a major water display with a center jet that shoots 150 feet into the air. At dusk, the Fountain’s water display is accompanied by a light and music show. During the winter, the fountain is decorated with festival lights.

The fountain’s official name is the Clarence Buckingham Memorial Fountain. On August 26, 1927, Kate Sturges Buckingham dedicated the structure to the people of Chicago in memory of her brother, Clarence. She donated one million dollars to the Fountain and established the Buckingham Fountain Endowment Fund to pay for its maintenance. The Fountain officially opened to the public on May 26, 1927.

The Buckingham Fountain consists of four basins composed of carved granite and pink Georgia marble. The bottom pool of the fountain is about 280 feet in diameter, with a 103-foot lower basin, a 60-foot middle basin, and a 24-foot upper basin.

Beaux arts architect Edward H. Bennett designed the Fountain with French sculptor Marcel Loyau and engineer Jacques H. Lambert. Its design was inspired by the Bassin de Latome and modeled after Latona Fountain at Versailles. The Buckingham Fountain however, is twice the size and recirculates approximately three times more water than Latona Fountain.

The Fountain is considered Chicago’s front door, located at Columbus Drive and Congress Parkway. It symbolizes Lake Michigan and four sea horses on the structure represent the states of Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Indiana, that border the lake.

In 1994, the fountain received about $2 million to restore its three smallest basins, which developed leaks due to Chicago’s winters. Recent renovation on the under drainage system, landscaping, lighting and bronze elements of Buckingham Fountain that began in September 2008 has not been completed due to lack of funds.

For more information about images of Buckingham Fountain, please, contact us at 312-666-9797.

 

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Buy Historic Black and White Chicago Building Photographs

Fisher Building
Fisher Building

Friedman Fine Art offers a diverse collection of historical and contemporary photographs in Chicago. At 275 feet, the Fisher Building is a 20-story neo-Gothic landmark, located in the Chicago Loop at 343 South Dearborn Street. The building is known for its interesting terra cotta tracery, or carvings of aquatic creatures including fish and crabs on the lower floors. There are carvings of eagles, dragons, and mythical creatures on the upper floors.

Designed by Charles Atwood of D.H. Burnham and Company, the first phase of the Fisher Building opened in 1896. This 18-story building measured about 230 feet tall and was the second-tallest building in the city at the time. Its steel frame took only 25 days to complete. An addition on the north side of the building was made in 1906, which raised the building from 18 to 20 stories. Former employee of the Burnham firm Peter J. Weber, designed and oversaw the addition, which was completed in 1907.

The interior of the building was decorated with expensive materials. Many of the floors had colorful mosaic designs. The wainscoting was composed of Carrara marble and mahogany wood was present in its the trim.

Today, the Fisher Building is the oldest 18-story building in Chicago that has not been demolished. It is currently owned and managed by Village Green Management Company, and has apartments on floors 3–20 and commercial stores on the first and second floors. To purchase this vintage photograph or more Chicago photographs.

Chicago Photos of The Famous Drake Hotel for Sale

Chicago Photograph Drake Hotel
The Drake Hotel

Friedman Fine Art offers historical and contemporary photographs in Chicago. Since its beginning on New Year’s Eve 1920, the Drake Hotel, located downtown on the lake side of Michigan Avenue, has been known for its elegance and hospitality. It features 535 elegantly decorated guest rooms and 74 suites, including a six-room Presidential Suite and several restaurants.

Some notable guests of the Hotel are Winston Churchill, Eleanor Roosevelt, President Dwight Eisenhower, Prince Charles, Walt Disney, Frank Sinatra, and President Ronald Reagan.

In 1916, Tracy Drake and John Drake acquired the property from the estate of Potter Palmer. Descendent William Drake and his wife lived at the hotel until the family lost the hotel during the Great Depression. Hilton International bought the Hotel in 1996, and starting two years later, corridors and guest rooms were renovated.

Located in the Magnificent Mile, the Drake Hotel connects the Gold Coast residential area and the new commercial area, north Michigan Avenue. It provides the perfect spaces for meetings and gatherings. It has classic decor, luxury bedding, marble bathrooms, and views of Lake Michigan and the city.

More Vintage Chicago Building Historical Photographs of Chicago.

Chicago’s Congress Hotel – Marvelous Photographs

Chicago Photos
Congress Hotel

Friedman Fine Art presents remarkable contemporary and historical photographs taken by Chicago photographers. The Congress Hotel is a historic Chicago hotel on Michigan Avenue, which was originally built to accommodate visitors to the World’s Columbian Exposition in 1893. Located across South Michigan Avenue from Grant Park in Chicago at 520 South Michigan Avenue, this 14-story hotel serviced our nation’s Presidents, foreign dignitaries, movie celebrities, and housed many conventions. The guestrooms and suites of the Congress Hotel are spacious and decorative, with stunning views of Lake Michigan.Designed by architect Clinton J. Warren, the 11-story structure was originally constructed for an annex to the Auditorium Theater across the street. The two buildings were linked by Peacock Alley, a marble underground passage. In 1902 and in 1907, the firm of Holabird & Roche oversaw construction of two additions, making the entire complex 1 million square feet.

In 1940, Chicago artist Louis Grell was commissioned to paint thirteen murals for the lunettes, architectural features around the grand lobby. The murals had popular scenes in Chicago at the time. In 1955 Pick had Grell paint three walls for the Pompeian Room which also housed the Louis Comfort Tiffany glass fountain. The building also features the famous Gold Room, one of Chicago’s most beautiful ballrooms. Find more Old Chicago Photos.

Buy Photos of Chicago’s Riverwalk

Chicago Pictures
Chicago Riverwalk

Friedman Fine Art presents contemporary and historical photographs of Chicago, including a diverse selection of black and white photographs. Called the “Second Lakefront,” the Chicago Riverwalk has been known as a great place to explore Chicago’s history, culture, and architecture. Extending from Lake Shore Drive to Franklin Street, the Riverwalk sits on the south bank of theChicago River in downtown Chicago.

The Riverwalk provides a quantity of public walkways and seating areas along the shore, where visitors can view skyscrapers and watch passing boats. The Riverwalk also has attractions such as cafes, boat cruises, tours, and water taxis.

The Riverwalk is the largest at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Plaza at State and Wabash streets, which was built in 2005 to commemorate the war. Here the Riverwalk consists of a lush lawn, a waterfall, and a center pool.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel plans to extend the Riverwalk for another six blocks along Chicago’s River, from State to Lake streets. Learn how to purchase more photos for your home of office by following this link, Chicago Photography and Chicago Photographs for sale.

The Baseball Palace of the World: Comiskey Park Vintage Chicago Photograph

Chicago Sports Photo

The original Comiskey Park, “The Baseball Palace of the World” is in the hearts of many Chicago White Sox fans to this day. Built in 1910 and turned into a parking lot of U.S. Cellular Field (formerly “New Comiskey Park”) in 1990, at the time of its demise it was the oldest park in Major League Baseball. It will always have iconic status as one of the ballparks during baseball’s glory days of the 1950s and 1960s, which saw the White Sox finish second for so many years behind the hated Yankees. The park was always recognizable with its unique Roman arches visible in the background of thousands of photos of major leaguers in the 20th century.

Comiskey Park was named after owner Charles Comiskey, who, while being a great ballplayer and instrumental force in early Major League Baseball, unfortunately was also a stingily owner who had his own player rebel against him in 1919 when the “Black Sox” threw the World Series, allegedly opting to accept more money from gamblers than they would have received as champions.

Other highlights of Comiskey Park include the first All-Star Game in 1933 and the 50th All-Star Game in 1950.

Unfortunately the White Sox didn’t have much success during the park’s lifespan. They won the World Series in 1917, and made it back in 1959, only to lose to the Dodgers.

At least White Sox fans who were patient another 15 years got to see the White Sox break their 88-year drought with a World Series Championship in 2005.

The Chicago River Locks Photograph on Lake Michigan Skyline

Building the Chicago River Locks 1937
Picture of the Building of the Chicago River Locks 1937

The Chicago River was awarded in 1999, by the American Society of Civil Engineers as a ‘Civil Engineering Monument of the Millennium’. This man-made waterflow system was out of necessity as extreme weather of 1885 threatened the city’s water supply.

The source of the main water stem is from Lake Michigan to the Chicago River. These waters are maintained through various locks that are on the basin of the lake to the Mississippi river.

Other contributors to the water flow of the city are the many bridges and fountains that memorialize the founders and revolutionary visionaries that have made Chicago a remarkable city.

Although there have been periods of slight flooding and different pollutants that have interrupted the river flow, the city has recovered and have celebrated this engineering accomplishment with many celebrations on the Chicago River including “Mayor Daley’s Chicago River Fishing Festival” and also the dying of the Chicago River on St. Patrick’s Day.

To buy photographs of historic Chicago.

1937 Chicago Photo – Tall Ships Grace Chicago’s Navy Pier

The Guinness Sailing Ship at Anchor by Navy Pier 1937
Old Photo of The Guinness Sailing Ship at Anchor by Navy Pier 1937

Navy Pier has been host to many ships over the years as it was a naval training base as well as one of the greatest inland ports in the world. Although known today as a place of entertainment, the pier has been home to many a venue. Built in 1914, architect Charles Sumner Frost and Daniel Burnham had a vision to make this a recreational and shipping dock that would be near the mouth of the Chicago River

Through World War I and II the pier was a barracks for soldiers, Red Cross and Home Defense. The pier has also had its own streetcar line, theater, restaurants and an emergency hospital. In 1995, the pier had a complete makeover and re-opened to the public with a big mix of food and entertainment including the Guiness World Record Ferris Wheel.

Since 1998, the Pier has hosted the Tall Ships Exhibit where people can board maritime vessels including some that at once graced the docks of the original pier. This year, Pepsi is once again sponsoring the Tall Ships Exhibit August 7-11.

To purchase photographs of the Historic Places of Chicago go here.

Historic Randolph Street Market Photograph in Chicago Illinois

Historic Picture of Chicago Randolph Street 1890s
Downtown Chicago Randolph Street Market 1890s

Today the Randolph Street Market is a monthly event that features antiques, art, fashion, food and music. But in the early days of Chicago, the Randolph Street Market was a way for immigrants to earn money.

Unfortunately, the Market became a place of horror on the night of May 4, 1886, when a bomb was thrown into the crowd of an anarchist meeting, killing several and injuring several more. The controversy was over the organizations of labor at the local factories including the McCormick Reaper Plant where a few days earlier a strike had erupted there where two were killed.

Although the Randolph Street Market happened to be the meeting place for the violence, the market still thrives today bringing in many visitors once a month. The market is now an indoor/outdoor market with nicely paved walkways outdoors and terrazzo floors inside. Many local vendors sell everything from food to clothing, but the most popular is the antique market. Click here to view and purchase early photos of Chicago.

Photographs of Fishing in Lake Michigan, Chicago Illinois

Chicago Photo of Lakefront Fishing 1940s
Vintage Lakefront Fishing Photograph from the 1940s

Just as it was back in the day, fishing is still great in Chicago. Beginning in the 1830s commercial fisherman reeled in many different species of fish off the shores and off-shores of Lake Michigan. Over the years, the pollution and non-native fish species have had the best of the lake.

Throughout history fishing has been a means of survival and an outlet for leisure and relaxation. And that tradition has moved all over the globe. Including Chicago and the suburbs. By 1917, The Chicago River was lined with industry and the rivers turned into streams that has led out to the Cook County Forest Preserves.

Fisherman of all ages and abilities still choose to cast out on Navy Pier, the Chicago Harbor and many other harbors and ports that line Lake Michigan today. Although fishing is not as much a survival necessity, there is still a need for relaxation and challenge of catching a world-class bass or a perch or salmon from the waters that inhabit Chicago. To purchase pictures of the History of Chicago go here