Chicago Photographs, 35 E. Wacker

Chicago Photographs, 35 E. Wacker

historic photograph of 35 E. Wacker
Historic, black and white photograph of 35 E. Wacker

Friedman Fine Art and chicago-photographs.com are pleased to provide you an array of historic and contemporary photographs of Chicago, including beautiful photos highlighting Chicago’s architecture. 35 E. Wacker is one of Chicago’s most iconic buildings and we have a number of historic, black and white pictures available for purchase, which feature this marvelous example of architecture. Designed by architects Frederick Thielbar and John Reed Rugard; and Joachim Giaver and Fredrick Dinkelberg, who did the building’s terra cotta cladding, 35 E. Wacker has a rich history since the building’s completion in 1926. Although the building’s tenants have changed throughout the years, 35 E. Wacker is best known for its original tenants and therefore, its name as the “Jeweler Building” where it housed most of Chicago’s diamond merchants. To see photographs featuring the iconic 35 E. Wacker, please follow the link to the slideshow, Chicago Photographs – 35 E. Wacker.

For information on how to purchase these beautiful and other marvelous photos, you can follow this link, Chicago Photography and Chicago Photographs.

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The Chicago River Locks Photograph on Lake Michigan Skyline

Building the Chicago River Locks 1937
Picture of the Building of the Chicago River Locks 1937

The Chicago River was awarded in 1999, by the American Society of Civil Engineers as a ‘Civil Engineering Monument of the Millennium’. This man-made waterflow system was out of necessity as extreme weather of 1885 threatened the city’s water supply.

The source of the main water stem is from Lake Michigan to the Chicago River. These waters are maintained through various locks that are on the basin of the lake to the Mississippi river.

Other contributors to the water flow of the city are the many bridges and fountains that memorialize the founders and revolutionary visionaries that have made Chicago a remarkable city.

Although there have been periods of slight flooding and different pollutants that have interrupted the river flow, the city has recovered and have celebrated this engineering accomplishment with many celebrations on the Chicago River including “Mayor Daley’s Chicago River Fishing Festival” and also the dying of the Chicago River on St. Patrick’s Day.

To buy photographs of historic Chicago.

Historic Randolph Street Market Photograph in Chicago Illinois

Historic Picture of Chicago Randolph Street 1890s
Downtown Chicago Randolph Street Market 1890s

Today the Randolph Street Market is a monthly event that features antiques, art, fashion, food and music. But in the early days of Chicago, the Randolph Street Market was a way for immigrants to earn money.

Unfortunately, the Market became a place of horror on the night of May 4, 1886, when a bomb was thrown into the crowd of an anarchist meeting, killing several and injuring several more. The controversy was over the organizations of labor at the local factories including the McCormick Reaper Plant where a few days earlier a strike had erupted there where two were killed.

Although the Randolph Street Market happened to be the meeting place for the violence, the market still thrives today bringing in many visitors once a month. The market is now an indoor/outdoor market with nicely paved walkways outdoors and terrazzo floors inside. Many local vendors sell everything from food to clothing, but the most popular is the antique market. Click here to view and purchase early photos of Chicago.

Photographs of Fishing in Lake Michigan, Chicago Illinois

Chicago Photo of Lakefront Fishing 1940s
Vintage Lakefront Fishing Photograph from the 1940s

Just as it was back in the day, fishing is still great in Chicago. Beginning in the 1830s commercial fisherman reeled in many different species of fish off the shores and off-shores of Lake Michigan. Over the years, the pollution and non-native fish species have had the best of the lake.

Throughout history fishing has been a means of survival and an outlet for leisure and relaxation. And that tradition has moved all over the globe. Including Chicago and the suburbs. By 1917, The Chicago River was lined with industry and the rivers turned into streams that has led out to the Cook County Forest Preserves.

Fisherman of all ages and abilities still choose to cast out on Navy Pier, the Chicago Harbor and many other harbors and ports that line Lake Michigan today. Although fishing is not as much a survival necessity, there is still a need for relaxation and challenge of catching a world-class bass or a perch or salmon from the waters that inhabit Chicago. To purchase pictures of the History of Chicago go here