Chicago Board of Trade Photographs

Chicago Board of Trade

CBOT 1938 Picture Old Chicago
Historical Chicago Board of Trade – 1938

Friedman Fine Art and chicago-photographs.com present a series of photographs highlighting the historic Chicago Board of Trade bbuilding located at 141 W. Jackson Boulevard. While the building is composed of two parts, the North Building, which was built in 1930 by architects Holabird and Root, has been designated as a Chicago landmark and its lobby along with the façade has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Among the various features, which distinguish the Chicago Board of Trade in the Chicago Skyline is the Ceres sculpture at the top of the building. The sculpture was designed by sculptor, John H. Storrs and features Ceres, the Roman goddess of grain, holding a sheaf of wheat and a bag of corn. To see more historic and contemporary pictures of the Chicago Board of Trade building, please click the link to our slideshow,
Chicago Board of Trade Photos .

For information on how to purchase these beautiful and other marvelous photos, you can follow this link, Chicago Photography and Chicago Photographs

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Chicago Photographs, 35 E. Wacker

Chicago Photographs, 35 E. Wacker

historic photograph of 35 E. Wacker
Historic, black and white photograph of 35 E. Wacker

Friedman Fine Art and chicago-photographs.com are pleased to provide you an array of historic and contemporary photographs of Chicago, including beautiful photos highlighting Chicago’s architecture. 35 E. Wacker is one of Chicago’s most iconic buildings and we have a number of historic, black and white pictures available for purchase, which feature this marvelous example of architecture. Designed by architects Frederick Thielbar and John Reed Rugard; and Joachim Giaver and Fredrick Dinkelberg, who did the building’s terra cotta cladding, 35 E. Wacker has a rich history since the building’s completion in 1926. Although the building’s tenants have changed throughout the years, 35 E. Wacker is best known for its original tenants and therefore, its name as the “Jeweler Building” where it housed most of Chicago’s diamond merchants. To see photographs featuring the iconic 35 E. Wacker, please follow the link to the slideshow, Chicago Photographs – 35 E. Wacker.

For information on how to purchase these beautiful and other marvelous photos, you can follow this link, Chicago Photography and Chicago Photographs.

Historical and Contemporary Photographs of Chicago, Illinois

CNA Building
CNA Building

Friedman Fine Art presents historical and contemporary photographs of the sites in Chicago. The CNA Center is located one block from Michigan Avenue and the open space of Grant Park, making it stand out. At 333 South Wabash Avenue in the Loop in Chicago, it was designed by Graham, Anderson, Probst & White and completed in 1972, opening a year later. Standing 44 stories, the rectangular structure was painted red to depict the sun setting over the ocean.

In 1999, a shard of glass fell from a 29th floor window and killed a woman walking on Wabash Avenue. It wasn’t the first time glass had fallen from the building. In 1994, glass had injured a man on the sidewalk below. The building had a history of cracking windows for more than 20 years.

After an investigation, the building’s owner paid a huge fine to the city and settled the lawsuit filed by the family. All 3,000 windows in the building were replaced with new glass. CNA Financial insurance company still physically checks each window monthly.

Today the windows on CNA Center are often used to produce light messages, typically those for holidays and other events. For example, in 2005 there were messages while the White Sox played and won the 2005 World Series. To purchase the photograph or learn about purchasing more of these marvelous photographs.

Chicago Photos of The Famous Drake Hotel for Sale

Chicago Photograph Drake Hotel
The Drake Hotel

Friedman Fine Art offers historical and contemporary photographs in Chicago. Since its beginning on New Year’s Eve 1920, the Drake Hotel, located downtown on the lake side of Michigan Avenue, has been known for its elegance and hospitality. It features 535 elegantly decorated guest rooms and 74 suites, including a six-room Presidential Suite and several restaurants.

Some notable guests of the Hotel are Winston Churchill, Eleanor Roosevelt, President Dwight Eisenhower, Prince Charles, Walt Disney, Frank Sinatra, and President Ronald Reagan.

In 1916, Tracy Drake and John Drake acquired the property from the estate of Potter Palmer. Descendent William Drake and his wife lived at the hotel until the family lost the hotel during the Great Depression. Hilton International bought the Hotel in 1996, and starting two years later, corridors and guest rooms were renovated.

Located in the Magnificent Mile, the Drake Hotel connects the Gold Coast residential area and the new commercial area, north Michigan Avenue. It provides the perfect spaces for meetings and gatherings. It has classic decor, luxury bedding, marble bathrooms, and views of Lake Michigan and the city.

More Vintage Chicago Building Historical Photographs of Chicago.

Buy Photos of Chicago’s Riverwalk

Chicago Pictures
Chicago Riverwalk

Friedman Fine Art presents contemporary and historical photographs of Chicago, including a diverse selection of black and white photographs. Called the “Second Lakefront,” the Chicago Riverwalk has been known as a great place to explore Chicago’s history, culture, and architecture. Extending from Lake Shore Drive to Franklin Street, the Riverwalk sits on the south bank of theChicago River in downtown Chicago.

The Riverwalk provides a quantity of public walkways and seating areas along the shore, where visitors can view skyscrapers and watch passing boats. The Riverwalk also has attractions such as cafes, boat cruises, tours, and water taxis.

The Riverwalk is the largest at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Plaza at State and Wabash streets, which was built in 2005 to commemorate the war. Here the Riverwalk consists of a lush lawn, a waterfall, and a center pool.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel plans to extend the Riverwalk for another six blocks along Chicago’s River, from State to Lake streets. Learn how to purchase more photos for your home of office by following this link, Chicago Photography and Chicago Photographs for sale.

The Baseball Palace of the World: Comiskey Park Vintage Chicago Photograph

Chicago Sports Photo

The original Comiskey Park, “The Baseball Palace of the World” is in the hearts of many Chicago White Sox fans to this day. Built in 1910 and turned into a parking lot of U.S. Cellular Field (formerly “New Comiskey Park”) in 1990, at the time of its demise it was the oldest park in Major League Baseball. It will always have iconic status as one of the ballparks during baseball’s glory days of the 1950s and 1960s, which saw the White Sox finish second for so many years behind the hated Yankees. The park was always recognizable with its unique Roman arches visible in the background of thousands of photos of major leaguers in the 20th century.

Comiskey Park was named after owner Charles Comiskey, who, while being a great ballplayer and instrumental force in early Major League Baseball, unfortunately was also a stingily owner who had his own player rebel against him in 1919 when the “Black Sox” threw the World Series, allegedly opting to accept more money from gamblers than they would have received as champions.

Other highlights of Comiskey Park include the first All-Star Game in 1933 and the 50th All-Star Game in 1950.

Unfortunately the White Sox didn’t have much success during the park’s lifespan. They won the World Series in 1917, and made it back in 1959, only to lose to the Dodgers.

At least White Sox fans who were patient another 15 years got to see the White Sox break their 88-year drought with a World Series Championship in 2005.

Marvelous Chicago River Photos for Sale

Chicago River Photo
Chicago River 1930 Copyright 2005 David R. Phillips

Friedman Fine Art and http://www.chicago-photographs.com are pleased to present this gorgeous historic Chicago River Photograph from 1930.

Pictured is an image of the historic Chicago River. Named “Chicagoua” after the smelly garlic plant found on the banks of the river once used by Native Americans. However, this would not be last time the Chicago River would have an odor problem. Pollution was a major issue for the growing city in the 19th century specifically in the river; in addition to businesses dumping their waste into the river, raw sewage flowed into is as well which in turn began to pollute the city’s clean water supply. Later, a proposal to reverse the flow of the river and to form a commission dedicated to sanitation.

By 1900 the Chicago River was cleaned of all the major impurities. Over the years, smaller rivers and canals were built to join the river together giving it a length of about 156 miles divided into two branches, North (as far north as Niles) and South (the downtown Chicago area) that converge at Wolf Point (Fulton Street) to form the main stem (Lake Michigan). Bridges that could move up and down for the passage of tall ships and boats were built to facilitate their passage and tunnels were built for traffic to not be disrupted during these periods are still in use today.

In 1915 Chicago’s most devastating tragedy occurred on the river when the Eastland boat overturned killing 844 people.

If you would like to purchase or view other contemporary or historical photographs of Chicago please follow this link Purchase Old Vintage Chicago Photos.